Hardest Metals Of The Earth

Hardness

Hardness is a relative term when talking about materials, both metal and non-metal. Diamonds
are commonly known as the hardest substance on earth, used in drill bits for cutting applications.
Of the natural elements titanium is considered to be extremely hard, if not the hardest. Alloys, a
combination of elements, can make the hardness of metal even higher. Factors for considering
hardness might include melting point, which usually points to a high hardness; scratch resistance;
density; tensile strength; yield strength; and a high value on different hardness scales.

Steel Alloys

Steel alloy is one of the most Hardest Metals Of The Earth.

Steel is a very common alloy and is combined with other metals and elements
to produce different properties. Carbon is a primary hardening ingredient for
steel and is used to increase its hardness and tensile strength. Chromium is added
to increase corrosion and oxidation resistance as well as hardening and high-
temperature strength. Boron, nickel, molybdenum, niobium and titanium can all
add strengthening and hardening properties. A combination of these different
substances can produce some of the hardest-known metals.

Tungsten Carbide

Tungston is  also Hardest Metal Of The Earth  

Tungsten carbide 857 is made of 85.7 percent tungsten carbide, 9.5 percent nickel,
1.8 percent tantalum, 1.5 percent titanium, 1 percent niobium and 0.3 percent
chromium. This tungsten carbide measures between 8 and 9 on the Mohs scale
(see “Hardness Scale” section for definition of Mohs), and ring form is said to be
the most scratch resistant in the world, does not deform and is the only metal that
can be permanently polished. Tungsten carbide is four times harder than titanium.

Titanium 

Titanium is Hradest Metal Of The Earth

Titanium is considered very hard for an element and can have tensile properties
between 35,000 psi and 100,000 psi. Titanium hardness is comparable to some
heat-treated alloys. Iodide titanium has a Vickers value of 90 VHN, unalloyed
titanium is about 160 VHN and heated-treated titanium can reach 250 to 500
VHN. Commercial alloys can have around 320 VHN (see “Hardness Scale”
section for definition of Vickers).

Uranium 

uranium is hardest metal on the earth

Uranium, although not as hard as titanium or metal alloys, is very useful for
its hardness and density. Uranium can be made into alloys with titanium and
molybdenum to be used as armor-piercing projectiles. They have the mass
and physical properties that allow them to penetrate armor better and at longer
distances. When tungsten rounds hit a target they can blunt, meaning some of
the energy is wasted and deforms the round, unlike uranium’s self-sharpening properties.

Hardness Scales

Hardness is not really a property but rather an artificial method used to compare
materials to each other. So if material A can scratch material B, then A must be
harder than B. If material C can scratch A, then on this particular hardness scale
B falls between A and C. The Mohs scale is a system that compares the scratch
resistance of materials compared to each other. The Vickers scale uses a diamond
indenter in the shape of a right pyramid, which is then pressed into the test
material for 10 to 15 seconds and reported as VHN or Vickers Hardness Number.
The value can also be reported as HV/x where HV is the harndess and x is the
force used.

Diamond: Diamond is hardest metal on the earth

Other:

• What is the second hardest metal on earth?
titanium
• What is the hardest moldable metal on earth?
Titanium can be formed/molded
• Is gold is the hardest metal?
No, I believe platinum is.
• Which is the hardest metal?
Lutemium
• What is the hardest metal in the world?
I`m pretty sure it is a mixture of Titanium and Lithium alloys

The hardest known metal alloy, and the hardest known metal in general, is a type of carbon
steel, Alloy 1090. With a tensile strength of .84 GPa (122,000 psi) and a yield strength of .64
GPa (67,000 psi), carbon steel is surpassed in hardness only by very hard nonmetals, such as
ruby, diamond, or aggregated diamond nanorods

Titanium is the hardest natural metal in the world. It is very strong,
three times the strength of steel and much stronger than gold, silver
and platinum and yet is very light weight.

• What is the hardest metal in the world?
I`m pretty sure it is a mixture of Titanium and Lithium alloys.
• Is metal one of the hardest material in the world?
Yes, they are but the hardest material in the world known to mankind is DIAMOND.
• What is the hardest metal?
The hardest known metal alloy, and the hardest known metal in general, is a type of carbon steel,

Alloy 1090. With a tensile strength of .84 GPa (122,000 psi) and a yield strength of .64 GPa
(67,000…
• What is the shiniest metal in the world?
Chromium.
• Which is the hardest metal?
Lutemium

The hardest known metal alloy, and the hardest known metal in general, is a type of carbon steel,
Alloy 1090. With a tensile strength of .84 GPa (122,000 psi) and a yield strength of .64 GPa
(67,000 psi), carbon steel is surpassed in hardness only by very hard nonmetals, such as ruby,
diamond, or aggregated diamond nanorods.

The best high-carbon steels rate an 8 on the Mohs scale of hardness, relative to ruby at 9 and
diamond at 10. The hardest metals are still somewhat soft in comparison to the strongest
nonmetals, based on the strongest bonds in chemistry, the sp2 bond between carbon atoms.

High-strength carbon steel goes through a process of tempering and annealing to make it harder.
After this process is complete such steel is called strengthened steel, the hardest metal available.
Carbon contents as great as 2% may be present in the hardest metal.

Another one of the hardest metals is tungsten carbide, used in both the military and for top-
shelf sports equipment. Depleted uranium, the metal of choice for tank shells, is not harder than
tungsten carbide or carbon steel but it is more dense, which is preferable for projectiles. The
strongest single element is osmium, used for high-grade pencils because it can withstand the
force of writing, even with a tiny tip. Osmium is $400 per troy ounce, much more expensive than
the alloy-based metals.

The best high-carbon steels rate an 8 on the Mohs scale of hardness, relative to ruby at 9 and
diamond at 10. The hardest metals are still somewhat soft in comparison to the strongest
nonmetals, based on the strongest bonds in chemistry, the sp2 bond between carbon atoms.

High-strength carbon steel goes through a process of tempering and annealing to make it harder.
After this process is complete such steel is called strengthened steel, the hardest metal available.
Carbon contents as great as 2% may be present in the hardest metal.

Another one of the hardest metals is tungsten carbide, used in both the military and for top-
shelf sports equipment. Depleted uranium, the metal of choice for tank shells, is not harder than
tungsten carbide or carbon steel but it is more dense, which is preferable for projectiles. The
strongest single element is osmium, used for high-grade pencils because it can withstand the
force of writing, even with a tiny tip. Osmium is $400 per troy ounce, much more expensive than
the alloy-based metals.

Most carbon steels melt at 2800 °F (1537 °C), and osmium at 5491 °F (3033 °C). Iridium and
titanium are also sometimes incorrectly called the hardest metals. Titanium has been used to
build the world’s deepest-diving submarines, however.

Sometimes very hard metals, like carbon steel, are undesirable because of their other properties.

Carbon steel, for instance, is notoriously corrosive. Just because it is the hardest metal does not
necessarily mean that it is the most useful for every job. “

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